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Do you think it’s possible to live year-round in Maine in a dome with a liner and heat?

Do you think it’s possible to live year-round in Maine in a dome with a liner and heat?

With a full liner and a stove, the dome would be comfortable in sub-zero temperatures. A liner reduces heat loss from radiation, conduction and convection, and creates an insulating dead air space of 2″-3″. It also prevents condensation which may occur in very cold situations. The full liner is constructed of a white fire-retardant ripstop film with clear vinyl windows for a wonderfully bright and warm space. (We also make liners out of the translucent greenhouse covering for our greenhouses.) To install, you tie it in place at each intersection point on the dome, pulling it tight. Installation is simple and takes about one hour. You can order a liner with your dome and install it right away, or decide to add one later. If you plan on spending a winter in your dome, a liner will produce a more evenly heated space and you will use less fuel. We make liners for our 11′, 14′, 18′, 20′, and 30′ domes.

In addition to a liner, you would have to have a stove and melt the snow off. In heavy snow your dome could collapse, damaging the contents, or compromising your shelter, or even putting your life or safety at risk. Do not rely on your dome as your only shelter where it snows. A backup emergency shelter might be a shed, trailer, a nearby neighbor’s house, or a snow cave.

A log cabin might be simpler.

Would a parachute function as a suitable liner?

No. A parachute would not fit tight inside the dome or create the nessacary dead air space.

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