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James Whitney

James Whitney

comments:
You indicate tarp use, but the missing value is in the ultralight materials (silicone impregnated nylon or the less expensive polyurethane nylon) that is very expensive to purchase as a finished tarp, but can be ordered as standard widths and sewn together for a more moderate cost. Sewing straight seems and hems is easy, but attaching secure loops is a more critical design feature. With the Light Fabric Grip Clips, the material can be fastened in any number of positions by the amature. For example, on a 10×10 sheet use 7 sets, three on the “lower” side and 4 sets evenly spaced on the “upper” side. Stake the lower side to the ground and put trekking poles into the holes on the center two upper side Grip Clips. Fasten the other two down to the ground. By adjusting the locations of the Grip Clips, and the pole heights, a floorless tent can be made that will accept a small piece of netting for complete the bug free domocile. Of course, by attaching the netting under the top two Grip Clips, the mesh door will be attached. The perfection of this system is, as you know, that the sides that are formed, can be swung open for more air (and more bugs). The design I’m describing can be adjusted for 4 season use with a campfire and will be a warm shelter. It isn’t as tall as what you show and keeps out the wind and rain. A shallow trench is dug inside the back of the shelter to drain water away from the camper(s). Metal grommets tend to be unreliable, but I know the Grip Clips hold up to the forces of tarps in wind.

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